Archive for the ‘Models’ Category

Application of Inquiry Learning Model to my Search Process

Friday, October 28th, 2011

Through this research study into inquiry-based learning I have progressed through the following process. This model has been slightly adapted from the Information Literacy Scope and Sequence created by the ONC Boces. (n.d). and found at http://encompass.cerfinfo.com/RSModel.htm. I chose to represent the model as a cycle as I believe that inquiry learning is an ongoing process with one cycle producing more questions for further exploration through subsequent inquiry processes. 

 

 

Question – At the beginning of the unit I was given the task to explore information literacy and inquiry-based learning.

 

Find – During the Find phase I identified where relevant information may be located. I decided to search a number of databases accessed through the university library such as ERIC, A+Education, Proquest, The Learning Federation and Google Scholar.

 

Gather – I conducted a number of searches for information on information literacy and inquiry-based learning using such alternative terms as inquiry AND learning, problem-based learning and enquiry AND learning. I refined searches by adding terms such as science and/or young students and/or primary and/or elementary or by selecting database options such as scholarly journals, date limits and subject limits. I then sorted through the returned results to select relevant material which I then read more thoroughly to develop my knowledge and assist me in the writing of my research paper.

 

Create – I used the resources I had gathered and the knowledge I have developed to write my research paper on the inquiry learning sequence I observed being undertaken by a group of year 2 students.

 

Assess/Reflect – I chose to rename this stage to include reflection as I felt assess just didn’t quite cover what I believe should be done in this stage. This stage allows the individual engaged in the process to both look back on their learning and look forward to what more learning could be undertaken. In this stage of my research task I reflected on my learning of both information literacy and inquiry learning as a result of my search process and the research study. I identified a subsequent research study that could be conducted in the research site as a result of my initial research study.   

 

ONC Boces. (n.d). Information Literacy Scope and Sequence. Accessed from http://encompass.cerfinfo.com/RSModel.htm

Reflections on Feedback from Context essay

Friday, October 7th, 2011

Having just recieved feedback for my context essay I am becoming aware that perhaps I am not reflecting or analysing things deeply enough. Although we were provided with the opportunity to give and recieve peer feedback no-one else from my group posted their context essays or provided me with feedback so the lecturer feeback is the first feedback I have recieved. In order to move forward now and make my work better for the final report I need to focus on the create and assess steps in the inquiry learning process. These two steps involve higher order thinking are are quite often the parts of the inquiry process that students struggle with most. I plan to adopt the Information Literacy Scope and Sequence model for inquiry-based learning and apply it to the assignment process in order to help me balance and achieve eah step in the process.

Information Literacy Scope and Sequence

Question

Find

Gather

Create

Assess

http://encompass.cerfinfo.com/RSModel.htm

Model for Information Literacy

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

Through my study in this unit I can across a model for Information Literacy that I think really encapsulates how information literacy fits into more traditional views of literacy. Information literacy is not separate from traditional conceptions of literacy but rather refers to new aspects of literacy which has been expanded by the rapid evolution of technology. As what it means to be literate changes so too does the overarching concept of literacy. This has pedagogical implications for educators as traditional teaching must be expanded to include the new literacies and prepare students for their future lives.

 

http://www.techtalk.ddsbschools.ca/doorway-to-information/skills-continuum.html

Models for Inquiry-based learning/information learning

Wednesday, September 28th, 2011

A large number of models for Inquiry-based learning/information learning exist to offer the teacher, teacher-librarian and student slightly differing pathways to knowledge. Many of the models are similar and it really depends on the needs and styles of the teacher and their students as to which model is adopted. www.ictnz.com/infolitmodels.htm offers an overview of a number of models. Common to a number of these models is that the information learning process is cyclical in nature. The SAUCE model, Digital Information Fluency (DIF) and the Research Cycle present visually cyclic models, however, by looking closely at most other models it is evident that any model for information learning could be represented cyclically. I personally like the idea that the process is cyclic as it is my pedagogical belief that learning is a continuous process and information learning often leads to new questions to be explored through subsequent search processes. Learning is not finite, as humans we are always asking why and answers to questions often produce new questions. I believe that the Information learning models included on the Infolitmodels website vary in quality and different models appeal to me personally more than others. Although the 8 Ws model included below may appeal to many educators and their students I find it somewhat confusing and unnecessary. The author has worked had to create names for each step in the process that begin with W, however, I struggle to see the connection between the terms assigned such as Wiggling and the action involved in that step, Evaluating. It is great when models are catchy but I don’t feel that this one necessarily will allow the process to be more easily learnt or remembered as the W term needs to be learnt as well as the corresponding meaning, which is often only vaguely associated with the W term.

 

Similarly the authors of the SAUCE model and the 3 Doors model  have worked to create catchy terminology, however I would question the use of the heading Celebrate Understanding in the SAUCE model to describe the synthesising step.

 

 

 

The 3 doors uses the terms Aim, Claim, Frame and unless the user had a lot more knowledge of the model and what the terms are actually referring to it would be almost impossible to work out what the 3 steps are referring to.

I personally quite like the Big6 model as it clearly and concisely defines each step in the process. I feel that although not as catchy as some models and not as comprehensive as others it allows the user to be guided adequately through the information learning process. For similar reasons I like the Digital Information Fluency cycle and the Information Literacy Scope and Sequence. I particularly like the Information Literacy Scope and Sequence as it not only clearly and concisely defines the steps in the process it also includes easy-to -remember headings for each step. These headings include;

 Question

Find

Gather

Create

Assess